Volume 7, Issue 6, December 2018, Page: 325-332
Assessment of Health Related Quality of Life in Cervical Cancer Patients in Western Kenya
Jane Adhiambo Owenga, Department of Public Health and Community Health and Development, School of Health Sciences, Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology, Bondo, Kenya
Received: Dec. 12, 2018;       Accepted: Dec. 25, 2018;       Published: Jan. 17, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajns.20180706.26      View  275      Downloads  47
Abstract
Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important health outcome in the holistic management of patients especially those suffering from life limiting conditions such as cervical cancer. In Kenya, Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women. However, little is known and documented on HRQoL of cervical cancer patients. This study assessed HRQoL of cervical cancer patients in western Kenya. A cross-sectional study involving 334 cervical cancer patients was conducted in Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Teaching and Referral Hospital (JOOTRH) in Kisumu from September 2014 to February 2015. FACT-Cx (The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy –for measuring Quality of Life in cervical cancer patients) Version 4 and a structured questionnaire were used to collect data. Quantitative data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS) Version 20 and Statistical Application Software (SAS) version 9.2 at a statistical significance of P ≤ 0.05, descriptive and inferential statistics were performed. The mean HRQoL was 35.35 (SD=13.21). More than half of the respondents experienced poor functional and physical wellbeing, 221 (66%) and 201 (60%) respectively and no patient experienced good functional and physical wellbeing. While 189 (57%) experienced fair overall quality of life. Multiple cumulative logistic regression analysis between cancer stage and treatment had statistically significant association with overall quality of life (X2 = 105.34 and 70.72; with df=3 and 6; p-values = 0.0001 and 0.0001, respectively); also between age, marital status, level of education and religion showed positive influence on overall quality of life except for religion (X2 = 21, 11, 113 and 4 with df=3 for all and p-values = 0.0001, 0.0121, 0.0001, 0.2563 respectively). Cervical cancer patients do fairly better with emotional and social wellbeing, while they experience poor functional and physical wellbeing due to large proportion of patients presenting at stage IV and III of the disease. There is a need to include HRQoL assessment in routine management of cervical cancer patients to enhance their quality of life.
Keywords
Cervical Cancer, Health Related Quality of Life, Kenya
To cite this article
Jane Adhiambo Owenga, Assessment of Health Related Quality of Life in Cervical Cancer Patients in Western Kenya, American Journal of Nursing Science. Vol. 7, No. 6, 2018, pp. 325-332. doi: 10.11648/j.ajns.20180706.26
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Globocan, International Agency for Research in Cancer, WHO, Editor. 2012 France.
[2]
NCCPP, Kenya National Cervical Cancer Prevention Program -Strategic Plan 2012-2015, M. o. P. H. a. S. a. M. o. M. services, Editor. 2012.
[3]
Morema, E. N., et al., Determinants of cervical screening services uptake among 18-49 year old women seeking services at the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Teaching and Referral Hospital, Kisumu, Kenya. BMC Health Serv Res, 2014. 14: p. 335.
[4]
Jones, G. L., et al., The impact of treatment for gynecological cancer on health-related quality of life (HRQoL): a systematic review. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 2006. 194(1): p. 26-42.
[5]
Muliira, R. S., A. S. Salas, and B. O'Brian, Quality of Life among Female Cancer Survivors in Africa: An Integrative Literature Review. PMC, 2017. 4(1): p. 6-17.
[6]
Verdugo, M. A., et al., The concept of quality of life and its role in enhancing human rights in the field of intellectual disability. J Intellect Disabil Res, 2012. 56(11): p. 1036-45.
[7]
Tadele, N., Evaluation of quality of life of adult cancer patients attending Tikur Anbessa specialized referral hospital, Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Ethiop J Health Sci, 2015. 25(1): p. 53-62.
[8]
Urasa, M. and E. Darj, Knowledge of cervical cancer and screening practices of nurses at a regional hospital in Tanzania. Afr Health Sci, 2011. 11(1): p. 48-57.
[9]
Muiva, N. M., Assessment of the quality of life issues of women with gynaecological and breast cancers in Kenya., in Nursing Department. 2014, Nairobi University.
[10]
Were, E. O. and N. G. Buziba, Presentation and health care seeking behaviour of patients with cervical cancer seen at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. East Afr Med J, 2001. 78(2): p. 55-9.
[11]
Masika, G. M., et al., Health-related quality of life and needs of care and support of adult Tanzanians with cancer: a mixed-methods study. Health Qual Life Outcomes, 2012. 10: p. 133.
[12]
Fadodun, O., et al., Health Related Quality of Life of Women With Cervical Cancer in the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria Global Oncology 2018.
[13]
Inzaule, S., et al., Incidence and predictors of first line antiretroviral regimen modification in western Kenya. PLoS One, 2014. 9(4): p. 93106.
[14]
Azmawati, M. N., et al., Quality of life by stage of cervical cancer among Malaysian patients. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 2014. 15(13): p. 5283-6.
[15]
Rahman, Z., et al., Assessment of Quality of Life in Treated Patients of Cancer Cervix. J Midlife Health, 2017. 8(4): p. 183-188.
[16]
Nie, S. X. and C. Q. Gao, Health behaviors and quality of life in Chinese survivors of cervical cancer: a retrospective study. Onco Targets Ther, 2014. 7: p. 627-32.
[17]
Ogoncho, I. M., et al., Determinants of Quality of Life Among Gynaecological Cancer Patients on Follow Up at a Referral Hospital in Kenya. American Journal of Nursing Science, 2015. Vol. 4(No. 3, 2015): p. 127-130.
[18]
Fang, P., et al., Psychosocial encounters correlates with higher patient-reported functional quality of life in gynecological cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Radiat Oncol, 2015. 10: p. 34.
[19]
Hawighorst-Knapstein, S., et al., The impact of treatment for genital cancer on quality of life and body image--results of a prospective longitudinal 10-year study. Gynecol Oncol, 2004. 94(2): p. 398-403.
[20]
Kamau, R. K., A. O. Osoti, and E. M. Njuguna, Effect of diagnosis and treatment of inoperable cervical cancer on quality of life among women receiving radiotherapy at Kenyatta National Hospital. East Afr Med J, 2007. 84(1): p. 24-30.
[21]
Nair, M. G., Quality of life in cancer of the cervix patients. Int Clin Psychopharmacol, 2000. 15 Suppl 3: p. S47-9.
[22]
Thapa, N., et al., Impact of cervical cancer on quality of life of women in Hubei, China. Sci Rep, 2018. 8(1): p. 11993.
[23]
Zhou, W., et al., Survey of cervical cancer survivors regarding quality of life and sexual function. Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics, 2016. 12(2): p. 938-944.
Browse journals by subject